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john davies
notes from a small vicar
from a parish
in Liverpool, UK

    Sunday, July 12, 2009
    Books to recommend to Greenbelters
     
    I got asked for a short list of books I'd recommend to Greenbelters. Some may possibly appear in the shop or the Festival Guide this year. Here's what I came up with...

    Henry Morgan and Roy Gregory (eds) The God You Already Know: Developing Your Spiritual and Prayer Life
    A wealth of wisdom and inspiration from the team which established Soul Space at Greenbelt.

    Merlin Coverley, Psychogeography
    Decent primer on the art of urban exploration

    Wrights and Sights, A Mis-Guide to Anywhere
    A guide book with a difference, inspiring new creative ways to see and experience the city

    Walter Brueggemann, The Land: Place as Gift, Promise, and Challenge in Biblical Faith
    A theology of place - essential reading for those who see the value in remaining rooted and grounded in a mobile age

    David Pinder, Visions of the City
    An account of utopian urbanism in the twentieth century - the dreams and dreamers who have shaped our cities

    Guy-Ernest Debord, Society of the Spectacle
    Classic text promoting a revolution in everyday life

    John Davies, Walking the M62
    A spiritual quest to find heaven in the ordinary on a long-distance walk from Hull to Liverpool

    Joe Moran, On Roads: A Hidden History
    An engrossing journey through the hidden history of our roads and our complex relationship with them.

    Bill Drummond, 17
    Bill's 17 choir performed at Greenbelt in 2007. This is the story of the man's mission to reinvent music.

    Plus, of course, a few books by GB09 contributor Iain Sinclair. One book I didn't put on the list (purely because I've not yet read it) Rod recommended to me this evening - The Black Death; An Intimate History, John Hatcher's deep portrayal of the effect of the creeping plague on the residents of a Suffolk parish, in particular through the experience of the local priest.